The Fallon Theory

Thanks to contributor “Aonghus Fallon” for this particular theory that covers multiple mysteries related to the show in a thought-provoking manner (minor editing by me):

Two of the most ancient myths known to man deal with exile. The first man and woman lived in a beautiful garden, immortal and unchanging – until they were tempted to eat the forbidden fruit of knowledge by the serpent. They were driven out of the garden and prevented from ever entering it again by an angel. The second myth concerns an angel who rises up against his father/creator and is exiled from heaven as a result. Some day he and his minions plan to storm the gates of heaven once more.

I think ‘Lost’ combines these two myths and tries to establish that they have a common ancestry.

THE ISLAND.
The island is the origin of all possible realities – as it is the origin of man and woman. It is also the location of the ‘Garden of Eden’, and the inhabitants of the island experience the beneficial effects of the island’s peculiar reality in the same way as did Adam and Even. To live on the island is to live in a state of stasis, immortal and unchanging, but equally unable to reproduce. Adam and Eve only procreated after leaving the garden.

THE GARDEN.
The ‘garden’ is located on the far side of the island. This is inhabited by a being who had a crucial role in the evolution of the human species, intentionally or otherwise. The actual nature of this ‘garden’ has become shrouded in myth. It might not be a ‘garden’ as such, anymore than it might contain a literal ‘tree of knowledge’ – but it does contain something worth having.

ANGELS.
The garden is protected by a creature which our ancestors might have described as an ‘angel’ but which Rousseau more accurately describes as a ‘security system.’ The biblical Jacob fought an angel, often believed to be samael, also known as the accuser. I can only assume the two ‘angels’ have been contracted into one. This would explain the peculiar effect the ‘angel’ has on those who confront it – how it takes the form of somebody they mistreated.

JACOB.
Jacob is a being who rose up against his creator, his ‘father’ and who was driven out of the garden as a result. This same Jacob encouraged man (another of his ‘father’s’ creations) to take the vital evolutionary step that resulted in his own ejection from the garden.

Jacob is determined to re-enter the garden, by force if necessary, and with this end in mind is recruiting a tribe of like-minded individuals – in the bible, Jacob was a jewish patriarch. This ‘tribe’ consists of his allies from the original insurrection along with anybody else who has ended up on the island in the meantime.

By ‘like-minded’ I mean Jacob is only interested in people willing to challenge the father-figure. If they have brought about their fathers’ deaths or – even better – killed their fathers, this makes them kindred souls. Just as only a truly holy person can see the face of God, your ability to see Jacob (or his willingness to be seen) depends on how great a role you played in your father’s demise. Ben assumes Locke will see Jacob after killing his natural father, not realising that Locke has only engineered his father’s death rather than killed him outright – ie. he got Sawyer to do the dirty work. Thus Locke only glimpses Jacob. He also hears him. Nonetheless, Ben is furious that Jacob permits Locke even this much, given that Locke hasn’t fulfilled the necessary criteria for tribe membership.

THE DHARMA INITIATIVE.
Direct exposure to the electro-magnetic field (located at the island’s core) leaves an individual with precognitive abilities – e.g. Des. The Initiative was set up with the intention of exploiting this feature for the greater good. People were immersed in this electro-magnetic field and then left the island as agents.Their role was to use their precognitive powers to influence the destiny of the world – ‘their’ world – in a positive way.

JOHN LOCKE.
In time the Initiative became aware of the garden’s existence as well as its importance. A group of precogs, permanently based on the island, established that Jacob’s army would attack the garden at some later stage. An exploration of all possible outcomes revealed that one key individual could successfully protect the garden and ensure that this attack failed – John Locke.

DHARMA VS. JACOB.
The Dharma Initiative’s decision to ensure John Locke’s arrival on the island via their powers brought them into conflict with Jacob’s tribe. A member of the initiative – Ben Linus – was recruited by the tribe and all members of the Iniative present on the island at that time were killed. The apparatus built by the Initiative was then used to create more precogs. However these precogs were dedicated to exploring how Jacob might succeed rather than fail in his attack on the garden. It became apparent that, just as Locke was crucial to the successful protection of the garden, there were others inhabiting his reality who would be crucial to Jacob’s cause.

THE CRASH.
The plane crash was orchestrated by Dharma field agents to ensure John Locke’s arrival on the island. However, Jacob’s field agents ensured a number of potential recruits were also on board.

FREE WILL.
Why not approach the people involved directly? From a very early stage it became apparent that a successful outcome was only possible (for either side) if events unfolded in a specific manner and order, the plane crash being a crucial example. I say either side because, whereas precogs can influence events, they cannot affect free will. Bringing John Locke to the island does not guarantee he will do as he is expected – although (once on the island) it is inevitable that he reach a point where he be given the opportunity to protect the garden. This is his ‘destiny’. Thus Ben’s attempts to sabotage this destiny – by trying to recruit Locke and then kill him – were doomed from the outset and show he is losing his grip.

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88 Responses to The Fallon Theory

  1. Tina says:

    Um, wow. Very thorough. Not sure how I feel about the precogs aspect of the theory, but everything else is plausible. Good job!

  2. charlie_ says:

    I don’t know if this has been mentioned before but would it not be inconsistent for one of the major mysteries of Lost to be explained by a solely Christian myth i.e. ‘The Garden of Eden’ or ‘Purgatory’ (I know this one has been be dunked) given that there are clearly other Religions represented on the island?

    Great lost blog btw.

  3. charlie_ says:

    de bunked even! ;-)

  4. Hammer says:

    Tina, accidentally pushed the thumbs down on your first comment…I don’t know what this is for…

  5. kris says:

    @Hammer

    The Thumbs up and down are used to rate that particular comment. We are experimenting with adding a few new features; we shall see if they are here for good or will not be used permanently.

  6. Will says:

    [quote comment="66481"]Tina, accidentally pushed the thumbs down on your first comment…I don’t know what this is for…[/quote]
    To add to Kris’ explanation, we hope this specific utility (thumbs up/thumbs down) will come in handy next season when we have hundreds of comments for a single post. We will eventually add a sort feature so that you can come back to a particular thread and sort based on the “karma” of the post, which hopefully means the really good stuff floats to the top…

  7. Hammer says:

    Thanks Kris and Will.

  8. Vladimir Cezar says:

    About the first point… Adam and Eve were actually able to procreate while living in the Garden. The bird process was painless and natural. Only when the lost the grace they would conceive children with labor pains. It is correct they would live forever, but is ALSO correct EVE could bear children.

    Just my 2 cents

  9. Hammer says:

    “THE ISLAND.
    The island is the origin of all possible realities – as it is the origin of man and woman. It is also the location of the ‘Garden of Eden’, and the inhabitants of the island experience the beneficial effects of the island’s peculiar reality in the same way as did Adam and Even. To live on the island is to live in a state of stasis, immortal and unchanging, but equally unable to reproduce. Adam and Eve only procreated after leaving the garden.”

    I really like your theory, but here’s some hole pokin': Living on the island doesn’t make everyone immortal or unchanged. Obviously Ben, his father and friend got older, and MANY people have died. Even the island’s Adam and Eve are dead. The question is WHO(Alpert?) is immortal and why. Also, WHO is unable to reproduce on the island? Are ALL of the others from the real world or are they “Alperesque”. We still don’t know where they came from.

  10. Hammer says:

    To further the free will point. Locke has often not interfered with Losties’ free will, but has clued them in as to what they should do. Ben is always “convincing” people to do things instead of just forcing them to. Until the end of S3, that is. His desperation has him messing with free will and fate. It seems Danielle may also know what is supposed to happen. She’s been waiting in the jungle for 16 years to confront the others? She turns Ben over the Losties? She disappears and reappears at odd times? Desmond was told not to bother messing with fate, but kept saving Charlie, but eventually…

    Going even deeper, Eko was “directed” onto the plane, Claire was too, you’ll remember pretty much all the main character were “directed” onto the plane. Are all these outsiders keepers of fate?

  11. Tina says:

    [quote comment="66513"]About the first point… Adam and Eve were actually able to procreate while living in the Garden. The bird process was painless and natural. Only when the lost the grace they would conceive children with labor pains. It is correct they would live forever, but is ALSO correct EVE could bear children.

    Just my 2 cents[/quote]
    ____________
    Not certain of this, but I’m pretty sure that there isn’t any report of Adam and Eve conceiving pre-fall or animals procreating either. It was only after the fall that they were commanded be fruitfull and multiply, but bear with them the pains of childbearing and labor, both of the body and the earth as punishment for theirs sins against God. It wouldn’t surprise me if they existed in a static immortality as you suggested of the islanders.

    Not certain, just trying to pry 4 years of Christian college out of the recesses of my brain.

  12. Hammer says:

    Your take on Jacob is interesting too. Could explain why everyone who survived the crash seems to have “daddy issues”.

    Also could explain why Jacob said “Help me.” Maybe he isn’t trapped in the cabin by Ben, but is literally asking Locke to help him in his cause. Though I am still intrigued by why they showed us the painting of a dog in Jacob’s cabin. An easter egg I just can’t figure out.

  13. Austin says:

    HOLY CRAP YES, no more comments necessary

  14. mike says:

    Wow, now you’re copying the Digg comment thumbs? UNBELIEVABLE!!!

  15. Jaclynn says:

    support for this theory
    -the animals (maybe Dharma didn’t bring them but only studied them) the only reason for polar bears to be on a hot island is if they were created there, and according to the story of Eden all species of animals were created there.
    -Jack’s desperation to get back to the island, very big clue, man has been struggling to re attain Eden since we were expulsed
    -In the bible it says that God left a “multi directional sword of flame” to protect the garden from re entry by man, could be the monster
    -it is commonly acknowledged that the garden of Eden was a part of a place called Eden, a part of the island?
    -is Jacob the serpent?
    -Adam and Eve found in the caves, were the names coincidental?
    -the “magic box” tree of knowledge??
    -the tree of life-reason for immortality and healing??
    -the four toed statue-Eden is theorized to have been buried underwater during the flood with Noah’s Ark prior to this it is believed the location was known, could be signs of an earlier civilization, damaaged by the flood
    -the difficulty to find it-Eden’s supposed to be impossible to find
    -the visions and whispers-angels sent to protect Eden?
    very cool theory, sounds very legit

  16. lost chicka says:

    really like the thumbs up thumbs down thing. :)

    i don’t like the theory at all. sorry. the only part i like is that jacob wants people with daddy issues. do we know anything about juliet’s dad or mother? i’m trying to remember & i can’t think of anytimes she talked about them…

  17. Kate says:

    Phew. Full on theroy there. I must admit I’m not too excited about the LOST mystery & series turning out to be religion based. But we’ll see how it pans out eh?
    I support the “daddy issues” aspect & in lieu of that can’t wait to see what Kate has in store as she killed he father in a most spectacular way! Perhaps that’s what Ben & Kate spoke about at their little breakfast meeting?
    We’ll see we’ll see. Bring on Feb 08

  18. Matt says:

    This theory is pretty lame.

  19. Anon says:

    A group of precogs would explain how The Others created dossiers of the Losties so quickly. Previously, I had thought that Ethan got their names, passed them to Ben, who then called his mainland people to research their backgrounds.

    But, with a group of precogs…

    – They already knew the plane was going to crash
    – They already knew who was going to be on it
    – Thus, they had plenty of time to do background checks and have the dossiers completed prior to the crash
    – Jacob had already chosen whom he wanted to abduct
    – And the purpose of collecting the names was merely to see which potential abductees had survived (but wouldn’t the precogs already know who was to survive??)

  20. Jesse says:

    Regarding Precogs collecting dossiers. By Ben Linus admission, Jack coming to the island was a surprise to him, “Do you believe in God, Jack…a [week] after being diagnoses with a tumor a spinal surgeon fell out of the sky. Also, Season 3, Ep. 1, Ben orders Ethan and others to gather information about who is on the plane.
    A note: The Others do not see very far into the future as they keep getting caught or killed. They appear to be bumbling through many things. Could we be reading into the show more philosophy than necessary? One impressive part of the Bible account of humanity is that it is just a story about ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances.
    You decide.

  21. Aonghus Fallon says:

    I really like your theory, but here’s some hole pokin': Living on the island doesn’t make everyone immortal or unchanged. Obviously Ben, his father and friend got older, and MANY people have died. Even the island’s Adam and Eve are dead. The question is WHO(Alpert?) is immortal and why. Also, WHO is unable to reproduce on the island? Are ALL of the others from the real world or are they “Alperesque”. We still don’t know where they came from.[/quote]

    Hammer,

    I agree. There’s a couple of big holes in my hypothesis. I meant to include a list of qualifiers.

    The garden is on the island – in other words, the garden is not the entire island. The features of the garden – stasis – are felt to a lesser extent throughout the island. Only within the garden are they absolute. And outside the garden they are inconsistent. I think Ben may be immune to the island’s influence for a number of reasons. He got a tumour. He obviously has the advice of precogs, but is unable to divine the consequences of his own actions, so he has never benefited from immersion. I think – outside the garden – you would probably enjoy a unnaturally protracted life-span, but this doesn’t make you immune to ‘acts of god’ (no pun intended). A severe injury will kill you.
    (2) It is possible that the inhabitant of the garden is exerting his powers selectively to further his own agenda – re Locke’s mysterious powers of recovery.

  22. aonghus fallon says:

    Also could explain why Jacob said “Help me.” Maybe he isn’t trapped in the cabin by Ben, but is literally asking Locke to help him in his cause. Though I am still intrigued by why they showed us the painting of a dog in Jacob’s cabin. An easter egg I just can’t figure out.

    Absolutely. I didn’t notice the dog, but it sounds like an interesting clue.

  23. rich says:

    my mate andy reckons the island is the devil and there’s a reverse purgatory deal going on….what do you reckon?

  24. aonghus fallon says:

    “To further the free will point. Locke has often not interfered with Losties….’

    Hammer,

    I’m not sure we’re in disagreement here. From what you say, Locke and Ben are careful to use the art of persuasion rather then coercion – i.e. they are careful not to interfere with an individual’s right to choose a particular course of action. The characters still have free will.
    In any event, I was thinking specifically about precogs. But you got me thinking. Maybe there should be one key restriction on precogs.

    Precogs can only influence events in such a way as to provide an individual with an additional choice. This choice must be crucial, life-altering decision.

    Simply put, you could say that precogs can only ensure a character fulfils a destiny greater than the one originally ordained for them. ‘Greater’ can mean a greater opportunity to commit evil as well as good.

    Thus Charlie chooses a worthwhile death over a pointless one. Ironically, Des ends up a character in the very narrative he is trying to influence. While Des the Precog tries to influence Charlie’s fate. Des the man reveals Charlie’s fate to him and so events move forward.

  25. meathead says:

    Ummm, these aren’t “Christian myths.” I guarantee if you’d refer to Islam as myth, there’d by an uproar.

  26. Other 218 says:

    Some good thoughts (some not). Needs more supportive explanation (facts) in most categories. “The Crash” section is just statement of ‘opinion’ with no support at all. The “Free Will” section had me the most worried… but Will later replied and appears not to be captured. -2

  27. Tina says:

    [quote comment="66854"]Ummm, these aren’t “Christian myths.” I guarantee if you’d refer to Islam as myth, there’d by an uproar.[/quote]
    ———-
    I don’t think his reference the these stories as “myths” was meant in a derogatory fashion, but rather in the anthropological sense of religious “myths”, i.e. the stories that varying religions tell. Don’t pick a fight where there doesn’t need to be one.

  28. lost chicka says:

    i have 3 problems with people being immortal in the garden:
    ~ i’m not convinced that mikhail is immortal. he said that the fence was turned up high enough too kill somebody & the island has healing powers.
    ~ richard not aging doesnt make him immortal.
    ~ nobody has come back from the dead.

    Locke isn’t the only one they want on the island. They wanted Jack (to do surgery on ben), Kate & Sawyer (to make a baby), Claire (cuz she was preggers), & Alex (for ben).

    I think you’re wrong about dharma. They weren’t doing experiments to see if electro magnets would make u precog & then see if u could change the world. They were doing some other type of experiments.

    I do think that Jacob’s “help me” was because he wanted locke to help him & join his cause. And it would make sense if Jacob wanted people with daddy issues since they all have em.

  29. Sarah says:

    Stop reading these Aonghus and do some work!

  30. aonghus fallon says:

    Will –

    On the basis of the points raised by Hammer and others, can I make a revision to the theory?

    THE ISLAND.
    The island is the origin of all possible realities – as it is the origin of man and woman. It is also the location of the ‘Garden of Eden’

    THE GARDEN.
    The ‘garden’ is located somewhere on the island. Any living creature within it exists in a state of stasis, immortal and unchanging, but equally unable to reproduce. Adam and Eve only procreated after leaving the garden. Even outside the garden, its peculiar laws affect the inhabitants of the island to varying degrees. e.g. women can conceive, but will die before they give birth and some characters exhibit unusual longevity, recuperative powers etc.

    The garden is inhabited by a being who had a crucial role in the evolution of the human species, intentionally or otherwise. The actual nature of this ‘garden’ has become shrouded in myth. It might not be a ‘garden’ as such, anymore than it might contain a literal ‘tree of knowledge’ – but it does contain something worth having.

  31. aonghus fallon says:

    Hammer –

    Earlier you asked about the dog in Jacob’s cabin. I just checked this out. It’s an additional clue in a theory which I considered including but discarded– mainly because it conflicts with some aspects of my original theory, but also because it raises so many questions. I guess the dog picture tips the balance in its favour, so here it goes. I really hate this theory and there are so many loose ends, I’d prefer if you didn’t include it in the original theory. More biblical stuff, I’m afraid…

    THE STORY OF ESAU AND JACOB.

    This is a long, convoluted story, so I’m only going to cite the relevant information.

    (1) Esau and Jacob were twins. To keep things simple, Easau was a hairy hunter (Esau in means ‘hairy’ in hebrew) whereas Jacob was a hairless hermit. Jacob was the younger and smarter of the two.
    (2) Jacob impersonated Esau in order to gain his birthright. Basically Jacob’s dad was blind and Jacob got his blessing (and presumably the family fortune in the process) by impersonating his older brother, using some goatskins to cover his arms – ie. to suggest they were hairier than they actually were.

    THE ‘ECKO STORYLINE’ – An easter-egg?

    The story of Ekco mimics or (har har) ‘echoes’ the story of Jacob and Esau with one crucial difference – the roles are reversed. Thus Ecko, the warrior and the outdoor type ends up impersonating his younger, holier brother and acquires his ‘birthright’ – his vocation – in the procss. Which brings us to Jacob and Locke….

    JACOB & LOCKE: DATA & LORE (?)

    The Ecko storyline is an easter egg, prefiguring the relationship between Jacob and Locke – i.e. that they’re brothers. It refers back to the story of Jacob and Esau, but it also establishes that some features of the Locke-Jacob storyline will be the other way round. So now we have a hairless hunter type and (on the basis of that one glimpse) a hairy recluse. And – unbeknownst to him – one brother is impersonating another….

    Oh yeah. And Esau had a dog. I’m not a talmudic scholar and I can’t find out a damn thing about it – just antiquated phrases like ‘How hairy was Esau’s dog?’ – and that the dog got sacrificed for some reason or other and that – being a hunter – Esau probably loved it.

    So on the basis of all this stuff, we’re meant to assume that Locke was originally from the island – explaining his ‘special’ relationship with it. He’s coming home. Maybe Jacob got rid of him somehow and took his place. Only now he’s back. And now the two brothers are going to fight one another – one attacking the garden (and his father) the other defending them.

  32. Hammer says:

    [quote comment="66831"]“To further the free will point. Locke has often not interfered with Losties….’

    Hammer,

    I’m not sure we’re in disagreement here. From what you say, Locke and Ben are careful to use the art of persuasion rather then coercion – i.e. they are careful not to interfere with an individual’s right to choose a particular course of action. The characters still have free will.
    In any event, I was thinking specifically about precogs. But you got me thinking. Maybe there should be one key restriction on precogs.

    Precogs can only influence events in such a way as to provide an individual with an additional choice. This choice must be crucial, life-altering decision.

    Simply put, you could say that precogs can only ensure a character fulfils a destiny greater than the one originally ordained for them. ‘Greater’ can mean a greater opportunity to commit evil as well as good.

    Thus Charlie chooses a worthwhile death over a pointless one. Ironically, Des ends up a character in the very narrative he is trying to influence. While Des the Precog tries to influence Charlie’s fate. Des the man reveals Charlie’s fate to him and so events move forward.[/quote]

    No disagreement…I was trying to further your point.

  33. Hammer says:

    Fallon – re: 31. I’m prefer to include it in your original theory as the show uses so much religion. I’ve been waiting for someone to help figure out why the dog painting was shown. This is a good thought.

  34. Seajam says:

    Nice theory. It has some bugs but they all do.

    So, based on this theory, is God himself (herself/itself) a player in all this? If we follow the Garden story through, it ends in Revelation, where God destroys the world and builds a new one. If we throw in what we know from the Lost Experience, DHARMA was attempting to manipulate the Valenzetti equation to produce different results, and, in effect, prevent the destruction of the world.

    BUT, if God is a player, and it is his will that the world be destroyed as described in Revelation, then are Ben and his people really the good guys after all and DHARMA the agents of evil? IF DHARMA had figured it out, the world (and the evil in it) would continue on.

    On a personal level, I would still have trouble reconciling Ben as one of the “good guys”, but from a biblical perspective, the great Judaic kings were all also military commanders, responsible for death in God’s name.

    Or maybe they’re all in that snowglobe.

  35. rejus says:

    Aonghus –

    The second part of your theory is even more interesting! And it could be true even if we find out that the first part is not.
    In Lost the names mean something, we know so well, but in this case is amazing. Damon Lindelof is Jewish, so he could actually have though something like that.

    [quote comment="67934"]
    So now we have a hairless hunter type and (on the basis of that one glimpse) a hairy recluse. And – unbeknownst to him – one brother is impersonating another….[/quote]

    That is a very fascinating point… but – from what I have understood – if Jacob was actually impersonating Esau/Locke he should be known as ‘Esau’ and not as his real name….

    [quote comment="67934"]
    So on the basis of all this stuff, we’re meant to assume that Locke was originally from the island – explaining his ‘special’ relationship with it. He’s coming home. Maybe Jacob got rid of him somehow and took his place. Only now he’s back. And now the two brothers are going to fight one another – one attacking the garden (and his father) the other defending them.[/quote]

    I think that the most important thing that you discovered is the possible relationship between the two. Maybe even Jacob is not from the Island and he found out he was supposed to go there to find his own meaning, just like Locke.

  36. Aonghus Fallon says:

    I’m prefer to include it in your original theory as the show uses so much religion. I’ve been waiting for someone to help figure out why the dog painting was shown. This is a good thought.

    Fair enough, but if we all think it through, maybe we could come up with an explanation that doesn’t conflict with the existing theory. There are a lot of problems re the time-line (although this depends on when Locke left the garden) Locke’s apparent amnesia and Ben’s inability to notice the eerie similarity between his boss and Locke. John’s (supposedly) biological father only compounds the issue.

    Anyhoo, it’s your call.

    Just to clarify – Esau is impersonating Jacob. John Locke (unbeknownst to him) is the true Jacob.

    This fact has a lot of ramifications. Crucially, the ‘others’ may be acting from positive motives. They believe Jacob is destined to ensure the island/garden is protected and they will do whatever he says in order to further this agenda. However they are worshipping a false prophet. I presume at some later stage, the truth will out and the cult will split into two factions; those who support John Locke and a hardcore who choose to remain followers of the ‘false’ Jacob – e.g. Ben, if he’s still around.

  37. Hammer says:

    Another bone to throw out there. Locke’s business name was “Welcome Home”, another clue to further your idea of Locke’s returning to the island as a homecoming.

  38. lckiii says:

    Am I the only person who thinks Jacob is Jacob Vanderfield from the Hanso Foundation?

  39. Hammer says:

    Ickiii – You may be correct, but how would you explain the fact that only Ben can see him and Locke could only hear him…but he was clearly there per the screne caps?

  40. aonghus fallon says:

    Guys, this is going to be my last blog, for various reasons.

    I think I figured out the Esau storyline in a way that’s consistent with my original theory. I had no reservations about posting up my first theory as a lot of people were accusing the series of going nowhere (or rather, in too many directions) whereas I felt the writers were following a clear narrative arc. If anything, showing people that the story had a direction and a point (and an overall structure) might help ratings – which, mind you, don’t need that much help.

    However, sometimes you can keep picking away at the threads of a story until there’s no story left. I like where they’re going with the Esau storyline and I think explaining my version of it in detail could be classified as a plot spoiler.

    Also, I had never posted anything onto any site until a fortnight ago. I had no idea it was this addictive. I seem to spend half my time analysing the various plot-lines of ‘Lost’ and well, basically…. life is too short. That said, I really enjoyed the site, your comments and theories etc, and wish you well, especially Hammer, Will and Rejus. I’ll leave you with a couple of (not very cryptic) clues re the Esau plot-line.

    (1) Lost boys.
    (2) A kid who loved his dog.
    (3) His dad was pretty furious. What was Esau hunting?
    (4) Who was that kidney really for?

  41. Hammer says:

    Fallon –

    Sorry to hear it…thanks for your contribution, I really enjoyed it.

  42. TribbieSt says:

    Perhaps this sounds picky, but there are a couple of points (Biblically) that need correcting. First, humans *were* able to procreate before the Fall – indeed, they were commanded to (Gen. I: 28).

    The angel with which Jacob wrestled is actually thought to have been God Himself, and Jacob actually receives a blessing from God because of it(Gen. XXXII: 22-30).

    Not sure how these two things influence your theory, but it seems to me that the role of Jacob in the show may need some revision. Nonetheless, you have made some *excellent* points. I particularly like the parallel between the cherub in Genesis and the smoke monster. Of course, in Genesis, it was plural – cherubim . . . I wonder if the smoke monster is actually a *series* of monsters. . . .

  43. Kenny says:

    This is off topic, but since there seem to be so many enlightened folks on here I wanted to pose a question…

    How is Jack’s father still alive?

    Barring resurrection, it’s only possible if Jack made a mistake identifying his own father’s body.

    Assuming it’s not resurrection, doesn’t this destroy all logic behind Jack being on the plane? No dead father means no trip to Australia?

  44. Lili says:

    A friend of mine told me that the director or writers of Lost said that Rose has a crucial role in all of it and that they are amazed that the public has not figured it out yet.

    I have been thinking and thinking about this but cannot seem to recall any significant information about Rose to even begin to understand her involvement. All I can recall is that she has/had cancer and that the island seems to have healed her.

  45. TribbieSt says:

    Kenny (#43),

    Excellent question. Sadly, I have no idea. Unless, of course, there is something to the “parallel universes” theory that’s surfaced once or twice on various boards. Perhaps in the next three seasons, we’ll begin to see more of the “universe course-correction,” and ramifications of that. For example, if Desmond had not saved Charlie those numerous times, then Charlie would have never shut down the Looking Glass, and Jack would have never made the rescue call. So, perhaps, something happens that undoes everything else – including Christian Shepherd’s death. Purely speculation, of course, since we haven’t seen the last three seasons.

  46. Paracelsus says:

    [quote comment="68699"]This is off topic, but since there seem to be so many enlightened folks on here I wanted to pose a question…

    How is Jack’s father still alive?

    Barring resurrection, it’s only possible if Jack made a mistake identifying his own father’s body.

    Assuming it’s not resurrection, doesn’t this destroy all logic behind Jack being on the plane? No dead father means no trip to Australia?[/quote]

    It was a flash to the future, not a flashback.

    Did you not see Jack meeting Kate and saying “I want to go back” etc..

  47. lost chicka says:

    i think that rose & bernard are adam & eve somehow. they were found with a black & white rock. a man and woman. why would bernard wanna leave if rose’s cancer would come back? i don’t know how to explain why their bodies would be there if they’re on the island now except for alt. reality or dfferent timeline.

  48. rejus says:

    [quote comment="68666"]Guys, this is going to be my last blog, for various reasons.
    [/quote]

    Ahh.. so hope to read some of your comments when next season begins! You did a very good job.

  49. Hammer says:

    [quote comment="68744"]A friend of mine told me that the director or writers of Lost said that Rose has a crucial role in all of it and that they are amazed that the public has not figured it out yet.

    I have been thinking and thinking about this but cannot seem to recall any significant information about Rose to even begin to understand her involvement. All I can recall is that she has/had cancer and that the island seems to have healed her.[/quote]
    Two things to consider: Rose mentioned that the sound of Smokey was very familiar to her. Rose has/had a daughter…Ms. Klugh?

  50. lckiii says:

    [quote comment="68699"]This is off topic, but since there seem to be so many enlightened folks on here I wanted to pose a question…

    How is Jack’s father still alive?

    I think Jack’s father like Sun’s father was involved with the Darma initiative.

    Likewise having knowledge of the island and things on the island like spiders that can make you seem dead when you are not. Jack’s father was given the same spider venom that paralyzed Nicki and Paoulo in order to fake his death lure Jack to Australia. Whether the crash was staged, predestined, planned, or an accident I do not claim to know.

    I do not want to believe the writers threw in the Nicki and Paoulo episode only as filler. I think the spider venom plays a role somewhere in the story.

  51. Hammer says:

    Kenny/Ickiii – That’s on of things that is cool about this show. Since we don’t know yet if there are ramifications for changing fate (nulifying his death), we don’t know if Sheppard was paralyzed or if he really is dead and future Jack’s drug use has him thinking his dad is alive…still very much up in air since there are at least three scenarios.

  52. ChampionDynamite says:

    RE: Hammer #49

    The reason Rose knew the sound is because the smoke monsters sound is the same sound that New York taxi cabs make when they give change or print a receipt or something(Damon and Carl said so in the last podcast) and Rose is from New York, which you hear her say in one of the first episodes when they are talking about the sound in the backround.

  53. Bobola says:

    Lost Chicka;
    I just made up 2 new Polar Bear Jokes (mostly to amuse you and bug that Limo guy)

    Why di the Polar Bear kill Limo Guy?
    Because he was Bi-Polar.

    But this is a flexible joke;

    Why did the boy Polar Bear have sex with another boy Polar Bear?
    Because he was Bi-Polar.

  54. Stephanie says:

    The newspaper clipping Jack held kinda showed Jer (and across the column) tham. There was a philospher named Jeremy BENtham that designed a prison (Panopticon)and described the concept of the design was to allow an observer to observe (-opticon) all (pan-) prisoners without the prisoners being able to tell if they are being observed or not, thus conveying a “sentiment of an invisible omniscience.” In his own words, Bentham described the Panopticon as “a new mode of obtaining power of mind over mind, in a quantity hitherto without example.” I believe that Ben was in the coffin and that is why no one was there…I am still contemplating the other things going on and will write when I believe…

  55. Bradford says:

    I don’t reckon it’s the garden of eden…more likely that it is not purgatory as understood by the Catholics but the much older theory of Limbo & Purgatory combined, as in Milton’s Paradise Lost (geddit) or Dante’s Divine Comedy. In fact in the Devine Comedy it mentions Limbo as an island in the south pacific, with a mountain in the centre. Further comparisons can be drawn with the Glutton (Hurley) who may only achieve his place in Heaven by actively seeking a useful role. Jacob is mentioned in the bible at some point as the keeper of purgatory (or limbo), limbo there being a table where Jacob dines. The Dharma initiative is probably a suicide cult or something. As for a picture of the dog, well…Locke tells a story about how his mum thought their stray retriever was his dead sister, then the kid finds the dog when his mum dies, then the kid gives the dog to Boon’s sister when he dies…the dog is a companion for those who lose a loved one…is it the same dog as Locke’s mum had? Maybe the picture of a dog has something to do with it. Or maybe the picture is Cerburus? And isn’t the polar bear straight out of Hurley’s comic as read by that kid?
    All I believe the numbers do is represent the mortality of mankind, thus if the island were the point between life and the aterlife, that would explain why the numbers bring people to the island (directly or indirectly). It may be that anyone who dies on the island returns to life, goes to heaven or hell. Is there such a thing as a unified theory of lost? ha

  56. Mmerlis says:

    Wow, thanks to everyone for replying to that original post you’ve provided me with much to think about while aimlessly sitting at my internship.

  57. Scott says:

    This post has been submitted to LostMarks.com. We encourage you to submit your own articles as well as any others about Lost that you find interesting.

  58. Ainee says:

    thanks for this theory.

    i tried to do some reading about jacob on wikipedia
    it’s also amazing that jacob’s youngest and twelfth son is named benjamin… this could be something we could ponder on between the connection of jacob and benjamin.. :)

  59. Ainee says:

    [quote comment="66513"]About the first point… Adam and Eve were actually able to procreate while living in the Garden. The bird process was painless and natural. Only when the lost the grace they would conceive children with labor pains. It is correct they would live forever, but is ALSO correct EVE could bear children.

    Just my 2 cents[/quote]

    yeah i agree.. it was only mentioned in the bible that because of what she had done she will experience the pain of labor.. thus she is capable of giving birth.

    i love this blog.. and i love seeing other lost addicts like myself.. you don’t need to rate what i wrote here.. i just thought i’d agree to what he said..

  60. Vladimir says:

    [quote comment="66567"][quote comment="66513"]About the first point… Adam and Eve were actually able to procreate while living in the Garden. The bird process was painless and natural. Only when the lost the grace they would conceive children with labor pains. It is correct they would live forever, but is ALSO correct EVE could bear children.

    Just my 2 cents[/quote]

    Errr. Just to correct you.
    ____________
    Not certain of this, but I’m pretty sure that there isn’t any report of Adam and Eve conceiving pre-fall or animals procreating either. It was only after the fall that they were commanded be fruitfull and multiply, but bear with them the pains of childbearing and labor, both of the body and the earth as punishment for theirs sins against God. It wouldn’t surprise me if they existed in a static immortality as you suggested of the islanders.

    Not certain, just trying to pry 4 years of Christian college out of the recesses of my brain.[/quote]
    In Genesis 1 28 God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number;” They are evicted only on chapter 3…. So, to make my point. The humanity, as described in Genesis would find no death. Never.

    Another 2 cents…

  61. Circus Mom says:

    [quote comment="66590"]support for this theory
    -the animals (maybe Dharma didn’t bring them but only studied them) the only reason for polar bears to be on a hot island is if they were created there, and according to the story of Eden all species of animals were created there.
    Didn’t Danielle’s boat crash 16 years ago, and wasn’t it carrying animals?

    -is Jacob the serpent?
    Maiby Ben is the serpant?
    -Adam and Eve found in the caves, were the names coincidental?
    Hmmm!

    [/quote]

  62. edg says:

    With respect to comment 35
    “if Jacob was actually impersonating Esau/Locke he should be known as ‘Esau’ and not as his real name….”

    As fallon points out, Esau is “hairy” in Hebrew. A German word for hair is Locke or Lokke. I don’t have my German dictionary at handy, but I know that Locken/Lokken means “tresses.”

  63. Aonghus Fallon says:

    SOME MORE THOUGHTS ON THE ISLAND.

    I signed off originally because I felt divulging a character’s storyline was a very different thing from giving a broad description re what was going on. However, I guess there’s no harm in elaborating on the basic nature of the island a bit more, in view of what we’ve learnt from the current series.

    A WHITE HOLE.

    The island is sphere of extremely dense matter that has been ejected via a ‘white hole’ into our universe. It generates an anomalous magnetic field, complete with north and south poles. This field is strong enough to create the sort of gravitational time dilation more typical of black holes, and it resembles a black hole’s event horizon in many respects. The closer you come to the island (once within its magnetic field) the further you travel back into the past – probably the very distant past. In real terms, this means the island is hidden in the past, and invisible to anybody not within its magnetic field. Time on the island passes far more slowly than it would in the outside world. The ‘garden’ – probably located underground and close to the island’s core – exists in a state of stasis or near stasis. Travelling away from the island is effectively travelling into the future – a future you will never reach unless you know the correct route out of the island’s event horizon.
    The island’s magnetic field is strongest at its north pole. Over time, ships, planes etc caught within its pull have been sucked, vortex-like, onto the island itself. Inversely, the island’s south pole ejects you back into ‘real time’, although not in the pacific, but off the coast of Svalbard. Formerly, this was the only means of leaving the island. In theory, no time at all should have elapsed during your absence, as the south pole projects you into the ‘future’ (relatively speaking) just as the north pole sucks you into the ‘past’, relatively speaking.
    As the south pole is at the opposite axis of the north, we can assume it is underwater. It is much less used, unless you count Ben, who uses it as a sort of back door when he’s cornered.

    SO WHAT’S UP?
    Although the island’s density is a factor, the island’s magnetic field is artificially sustained, and over the last fifty years there has been a pronounced deterioration in its strength. Indeed, the island is beginning to demonstrate all the features of full-scale pole reversal. Characteristically, pole reversal begins with a deterioration in the strength of the two poles, even while the rest of the magnetic field remains stable. The north pole of the island has lost strength to such a degree that it is now possible to leave as well as reach the island by this route, something which enabled the Dharma Initiative to set up business in the first place. A similar process is also taking place re the island’s south pole.
    More worringly, the island’s north pole is beginning to demonstrate the characteristics of the island’s south pole. Normally a ship pulled by its magnetic influence onto the island would arrive several days before its first encounter with that self-same influence – but Faraday’s payload is delayed some thirty minutes after he asks for it, something which he might have expected if the delivery were being made via the south pole conduit, but not the north. Faraday probably hoped the north pole was at a point in its transition where it was operating close to ‘real time’, something which it has been doing (more or less) for the previous few decades. However this was not the case. If anything the process of pole reversal seems to have suddenly accelerated, probably partially due to the shutdown.

    The poles are also shifting in relation to the world outside the island. The south pole was originally located at Svalbard. It has now shifted southwards, towards Tunisia.
    The consequences for the island (if the process is not reversed) are catastrophic. Crucially the island, a sacred place, will no longer be hidden. It will exist in ‘real time’.

    HOW DOES THIS FIT IN WITH MY PREVIOUS THEORY?

    Well, the ‘origin of all possible realities’ was probably laying it on a bit thick. And it now seems that Jacob, like Locke, was reared away from the island until he proved himself a suitable candidate as its saviour. So the fallen Lucifer he ain’t. But I think he’ll turn out to be the ‘Prince of Lies’ just like Ben, his most devoted acolyte. Other than that, I guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

    EXAMPLE.
    Widmore’s land team can contact the crew in approximate real time (the time delay would be minute) as long as the ship is anchored along the north pole’s co-ordinates. However the doctor’s body was carried by ocean currents away from the ship and into the island’s event horizon. Thus the islanders find his body several days before he is due to be killed.

  64. Aonghus Fallon says:

    island.jpg

  65. Aonghus Fallon says:

    YET MORE THOUGHTS ON THE ISLAND – AND THEN I’M DONE.

    A correction, a clarification and a few qualifications.

    (1) The island’s time-line. I said in my previous entry that time ‘passed more slowly’ on the island. I hadn’t seen ‘There’s no place like home’ yet – in which we learned that time on the island was consistent with the outside world. However, there may be an explanation. If time on the island follows its magnetic current, then being on the island means inhabiting a temporal loop, an idea suggested before. In which case, two questions need to be asked – firstly, just how long is this ‘loop? We already have a rough idea – i.e. not long enough for a woman to conceive and bring a child to term, but long enough for the Oceanic Six to be unaffected by it during their stay on the island. Secondly, what is its exact nature? More specifically, does anybody remember what happened last time round? Or is it like a moebius strip, ever-repeating yet infinite? Maybe just people’s biological clocks are put back, while they still retain their memories, to the extent that they’re not even aware there is a ‘loop’.

    I think getting the Oceanic Six off the island was really about answering these questions. It was never about what happens to them after they’ve left the island – it’s what they find when they get back which will be interesting, as they’ve been literally ‘outside the loop’ while the rest of the cast stayed on the island.

    (2) Jacob’s cabin. If you assume the existence of a temporal loop, then Jacob’s cabin – properly speaking, Horaces’s cabin, since he built it – exists outside the loop. Jacob (possibly with the help of others) is trying to influence the course of events within the loop to produce a desired result. Bringing new people onto the island changes the variables and gives him a fresh chance of getting it right. Even so, he keeps screwing up. As the cabin can manifest itslf in both time-lines, it is the only place from which you can directly intervene in events within the loop, albeit without leaving the cabin itself. The cabin only appears to ‘moving’. Its location in Jacob’s time-line is fixed, but as the island rotates and the loop’s time-line and Jacob’s timeline aren’t synchronous, to those within the loop the house seems to follow an approximate orbit, always at the same altitude.
    To intevene in events, you have to wait until the cabin’s orbit and your constant intersect. Hurley sees the cabin because he is the constant of the person in the cabin at that particular time. I like the idea that this person might be Hurley himself – Future Hurley – but I’m not sure if you can be your own constant. In any event, Ben knows Hurley’s significant other is in the cabin, and that Hurley is therefore crucial to the successful appearance of the cabin.

    (3) The whisperers, theory 1. The loop is like a very old, scratched tape over which various, faintly similar recordings have been made again and again. The central characters are hearing echoes of arguments which they’ve had at certain crucial junctures during earlier (or future?) incarnations of the loop.

    (4) The whisperers, theory II. The events taking place within the loop are being watched by an unseen audience. This consists of those outside the loop – amongst them former players who’ve died – all urging the characters to follow this or that course of action.

    (5) Jacob’s identity. I sincerely hope I’m wrong, but that damn rabbit is highly significant. Older brother, me arse.

    (6) Some qualifications. The Dharma Initiative deliberately capped the north pole, probably so they could enter and leave the island by the same conduit. So the weakness of this pole is not entirely due to pole reversal. Secondly, I implied the polar bears swam in via the south pole exit (both poles being in neutral at the time) then remained on the island long enough for the poles to shift (a not unreasonable assumption if you take the temporal loop into consideration) so that when one tried to swim home he ended up in Tunisia – this, incidentally, is how Widmore’s team were able to locate the island. Discovering the skeleton enabled them to pinpoint the southpole conduit, which in turn let them extrapolate the location of the more accessible north pole conduit.
    However pole reversal could occur on a regular basis – the sun reverses poles every eleven years. That bear could have been ejected by the same conduit which first sucked him in.

  66. Hammer says:

    [quote comment="227422"]
    (4) The whisperers, theory II. The events taking place within the loop are being watched by an unseen audience. This consists of those outside the loop – amongst them former players who’ve died – all urging the characters to follow this or that course of action.

    [/quote]
    I assume you’ve read my Whisperers Theory. I am all for your(my) theory II. ;)

  67. Ryan says:

    This is such a far-fetched crock of crap. I strongly doubt the show is based on Christian mythology (The majority of Christian sects do actually consider the Adam and Eve story to be a myth, btw) Christians always need to try and Biblicize everything to such unneccessary degrees. Its pathetic.

    Anyway, Christianity is probably the LEAST directly referenced religion on the show. And even in a Christian scope your theory hardly even makes logical sense. Even in your edits your just changing the show to match your theory instead of changing your theory to match the show. How so very Augustin of you!

  68. Aonghus Fallon says:

    [quote comment="237001"]This is such a far-fetched crock of crap. I strongly doubt the show is based on Christian mythology (The majority of Christian sects do actually consider the Adam and Eve story to be a myth, btw) Christians always need to try and Biblicize everything to such unneccessary degrees. Its pathetic.

    Anyway, Christianity is probably the LEAST directly referenced religion on the show. And even in a Christian scope your theory hardly even makes logical sense. Even in your edits your just changing the show to match your theory instead of changing your theory to match the show. How so very Augustin of you![/quote]

    Interviewer: You’ve always used books for inspiration. Would you recommend any literature relevant to LOST in the future?

    Carlton Cuse: That is a really good question. Huh. I don’t know. Continue reading the Bible.

    I said the two myths had a common ancestry. By this I simply meant the scriptwriters were hinting that certain myths were inspired by the island in the same way that Atlantis or the Siege of Troy were probably inspired by real locations and events. Nothing more. I think the third series contained far more biblical allusions than the fourth, so at the time I thought they might be heading in this direction. The fourth focused on the ‘science’ aspect of the island and it’s now pretty obvious that we’re dealing with a science fiction series with biblical overtones, rather than the other way round. Jacob aside, I still think the island inspired the myth of Eden – or rather, that this is what the writers want us to believe – and that there will be other biblical references down along the line, mostly Old Testament.
    ‘Christians always need to Biblicise everything..’ ?? I wouldn’t know, having been a devout atheist all my life.

  69. Aonghus Fallon says:

    And I may be right about that too….

    I discounted one aspect of my original theory when I updated it – i.e. the notion that Jacob was the fallen Lucifer. That all depends. I think he may well be, on a purely symbolic level, and there’s quite a number of funny little clues to suggest that this is how we are meant to see him. To make this idea work, you just have to substitute ‘the garden’ for ‘the loop’.
    Thanks to Ryan for inspiring me and belated credit to Circus Mom who suggested Ben might be the serpent. Of course he is – on purely symbolic terms, that is.

  70. Aonghus Fallon says:

    Sorry…that should be the other way round – i.e. ‘the loop’ for ‘the garden’

  71. atruewalker says:

    Ahongus, please don’t go before you give a few more hints about the dog. I’m no biblical scholar, and don’t have a dog. What are your thoughts about the doggie connection?

  72. kasino 150 says:

    I finally got a chance to check out your web page, and I must say that I’m impressed. Hope everything is going well. Take care!

  73. me says:

    wHAT ABOUT WALT CONNECTION TO THE ISLAND HE KNOWS WHATS GOING ON EVEN THOUGH HE IS NOT THERE. MAYBE SOME LINK THOUGH UNCONSICIOUS MIND, DREAM WORLD, BUT I THINK THIS IS THE PIECE MISSING FFROM ALL THERIES I HAVE READ

  74. dobolina says:

    Very good work, however this is pure speculation what about Sayid being a muslim. What would be the reason for all the people with no ties to either group(rose,Bernard) to name a few. Also the “tribe” embraced John when he arrived they have no idea he didnt kill his father. Your reading into it maybe a little to much Im not sure even the creators know whats going on

  75. Aonghus Fallon says:

    A true walker –

    I’ve refrained from further speculations re Jacob’s identity largely because the writers are presenting us with two different sets of clues, with what (I would regard as) mutually exclusive outcomes. I intended to sit tight and see which was the correct one, but I’m kind of bored right now, so what the hell –

    BROTHERS?

    The first set of clues hints that Jacob is, in fact, Locke’s older brother. The dog is a crucial clue and I’ve already outlined what we can deduce from the picture, the eko storyline and the original story of Jacob and Esau. This is so subtly presented that part of me is convinced it must be the correct explanation. I don’t think they meant us to solve this clue, only to recognise it retrospectively. In short, they’re covering their asses against any allegations that they’re making all this stuff up as they go along.

    LOCKE=JACOB=LUCIFER.

    This storyline has a lot going for it. Something goes disastrously wrong, the island’s power source is shut down and the island is back where it belongs – in the distant past. A small number of Losties survive but are now trapped in the cretaceous era. Somehow they have access to the temporal loop, but only via the cabin – which they cannot leave. Via the cabin, they try to influence the choices made by their earlier selves and other Losties to ensure a happier outcome. In this storyline, Jacob is of course Locke: old, ill and deeply bitter over his unsucessful battle with the island’s true master – his ‘father’.

    I’ve already outlined my proof in relation to the ‘brothers’ storyline, but what about the second one? Well…

    In my original theory I argued that although two distinct forces were trying to influence the characters, they could not coerce them. The characters still had free will. This is one of the basic ground rules respected by God and the Devil in their battle for human souls. So Jacob is Lucifer. This argument is more compelling if you take into account the evidence suggesting Locke is Lucifer, and by extension, Jacob.

    LOCKE AS LUCIFER.

    There are at least three clues to support this hypothesis.

    THE ORIGINAL JOHN LOCKE – PHILOSOPHER.
    This is pretty dry stuff about the nature of government. The only relevant section is Locke’s defense of rebellion. Locke believed that rebellion was justified in certain circumstances, specifically against an unjust government. The theory has been challenged a number of times and the analogy of the rebel angels used – i.e. by Locke’s criteria Lucifer was justified in acting as he did.

    DANTE’S INFERNO AND JOHN LOCKE’S ACCIDENT.
    Dante’s lucifer is flung out of heaven by his father. So great is his fall that he creates nine concentric craters – the famous ‘Nine Rings of Hell’ – on landing, occupying the centermost crater (the ring devoted to traitors, for he is the greatest traitor of all) where he’s stuck fast. Thus Dante’s Lucifer is not some swaggering, caped gentleman with horns and a cane who can go where he pleases. He is effectively a cripple, as he has no movement from the waist down.
    I guess there’s no need to labour the analogy. Locke was flung (from a hospital window) by his father and paralysed as a result.

    J.J. ABRAMS.
    I only ever watched one episode of ‘Alias’. Coincidentally it was the episode in which the characters discover their nemesis is in fact their boss. Not their current and uncorrupted boss – his evil future self. At least, that’s how it looked to me. Like I said, I only watched one episode. Still…

  76. Taralikeslost says:

    I completely agree with what you are saying, I have believed for a while that the island is eden.

    The Numbers
    – if you add up the numbers that you have to punch in, they give you psalm three which reveals the truth about eden in the garden. Perhaps the DI was a group that settled in order to scientifically monitor sin and chaos that were born on the island. (the human factor in the V code which determines the end of the world) Perhaps the hatch literally were changing the world, prolonging our time here.

    The Map
    The Map that Locke views in the hatch designates a large portion of the island as unknown land.
    “In the account, the garden is planted “eastward, in Eden,” and accordingly “Eden” properly denotes the larger territory which contains the garden, rather than being the name of the garden itself: it is, thus, the garden located in Eden. The Talmud also states (Brachos 34b) that the Garden is distinct from Eden.” They have never traveled far east on the island and when they have like Eko, they have been attacked by the black smoke monster which could be seen as the protector of the garden. “It is at this point that ‘God expels them from Eden’, to keep Adam and Eve from partaking of the Tree of Life. The story says that God placed cherubim with an omnidirectional “flaming sword” to guard against any future entrance into the garden.” Eko dies when he tries to go too far into the garden, right before he dies we see that amazingly large tree the tree of life.

    Black and White.
    In the first season when the two skeletons are discovered in the caves they are called adam and eve, and they have black and white stones in their pockets. In pilot episode part 2, Locke is teaching Walt about backgameon and explains how it is an ancient battle of good and bad. Later Locke is seen in a dream with a black eye and a white eye. Richard always said Locke was known to be special like their was some sort of a prophecy about him. Therefore Ben tries to derail that by making him kill his father, proving that like Ben he forges against his creator. However, John Locke like the thinker believes in an innate morality of humans, that we have free will to make the right choices. I strongly believe that Ben wants the Garden to be stormed by people who feel similar to him. Aka when the “list” is formed of what islanders to take, he gathers people like : Jack, Kate, Sawyer, Hurley. All of whom have been hurt, have hurt or have had problems with their specific creators. Ben wanted Locke to be like him then the “prophecy” or whatever is said about Locke may be proved untrue, however, he can’t do it, therefore he can not see Jacob anymore. Perhaps this is also why Ben kills Locke, once he found out that his allied with Hawking (she may be good).

    The War
    Since Adam and Eve were expelled from the island. Satan swore once he had enough followers of like minded people that he would storm the garden once more and take it. Perhaps lost is commenting on how change our society has become and that even people like Jack have had resentment towards their creator. Charles W stated that there was going to be a war over the island, perhaps in Lockes words the “ancient battle of good and bad”.

  77. Aonghus Fallon says:

    Sounds like we’re singing from the same hymn sheet to me. Re ‘the war’. I think the series is a commentary on free will. The writers are asking us a fundamental question – was Lucifer wrong? Would you have behaved differently in the same situation? And (in a very subtle way)they’ve shown us what it’s like to be one of the island’s angelic minions. To become an angel, a man must first die then be reborn. However, an angel is different from a man on one fundamental level he/she lacks free will. Thus anybody resurrected by the island (jack’s dad, Ben) may appear the same, but they are not. They are utterly, blindly loyal to the island and its master. Now put yourself in Locke’s position. Supposing this was the price of immortality – total abnegation – and the alternative was rebellion. Which would you choose?

  78. Aonghus Fallon says:

    I read a lot and I’m pretty certain Satan is sometimes depicted with one black eye and one white eye. I considered including the dream sequence in my original proofs on this basis, but I can’t remember where I came across this particular fact, so I left it out.

  79. aonghus fallon says:

    Of course we now know he’s not really Locke at all (although cloned from him)as an entirely different personality inhabits that body. Methinks Esau is going to regret making somebody in his own image – the image of his soul anyway – bigtime….

  80. Aonghus Fallon says:

    I think it’s important – on the basis of what we’ve learnt in the previous series – to clarify that Jacob and Esau are NOT god and the devil. True, they are complementary opposites locked in an eternal stuggle, but their respective personalities have far more to do with the Chinese Yin & Yang, than with good and evil.

    ESAU.
    Esau is a control freak. Melancholy and obsessive, he hates any sort of change or disruption. His priority is protecting the island from any incursions. Esau’s followers (as opposed to his soldiers) see themselves as supporters of law-and-order, fighters against chaos.

    JACOB.
    Jacob is more restless. We know he gets around, whereas it’s unlikely that Esau has ever left the island. He embraces change and disruption. You could say his job is recognising the importance of adaptablity and its role in the long-term survival of the island. His followers believe people should follow their own consciences rather than be constrained by rules.

    SMOKEY.
    We’re already familiar with old Smokey. Smokey patrols the island, attacking or abducting anybody it perceives as a threat. It is also programmed to coerce people by taking the form of those they have mistreated – i.e. by emotional blackmail. There seems to be a lot of debate about Smokey’s real identity, but it is precisely what Rousseau described it to be – a security system, nothing more or less, designed to deal with threats by physical or pyschological means. It is not ‘alive’ in any real sense.

    Collectively the three ensure the continued welfare of the island.

    ESAU’S ARMY.
    Esau is helped fulfil his remit by very unusual means: the island clones the bodies of the dead. These clones can absorb the memories of the recently deceased in their entirety*, thus rendering them indistinguishable from those they are impersonating. They are hardwired to prioritise the safety of the island above everything else, including their own lives if need be. They are aware from the start that they are copies, what is expected of them, and the consequences of any disobedience. They are ultimately answerable to Esau.

    It is important to distinguish Esau’s clones, who have a tangible, corporeal existence, from the phantoms conjured up by Smokey.

    *Miles, as somebody born on the island, has this ability but to a much lesser extent.

    THE RULES.
    Given the disparate philosophies of the two brothers, the island enforces a simple set of laws to ensure the Pax Romana.

    (1) You cannot harm one another.
    (2) You can only affect change via intermediaries.
    (3) You must respect the free will of these intermediaries – that is, they must be acting of their own free will, although you can use your powers of persuasion if you so desire.

    Esau’s army do not constitute intermediaries. They are simulacrums and without free will. However, that might change….

    SO WHAT’S GOING ON?

    The ship’s arrival was the last straw for Esau, who finally decided he’d had enough of Jacob’s disruptive behaviour. Discovering that Jacob was grooming a new leader for his tribe, he saw a means of assassinating his brother.

    This involved reaching into the past (via Horace’s cabin) and influencing events by impersonating Jacob* – we can only assume the real Jacob was off on his travels during this period. Ultimately Esau hoped to ‘turn’ John Locke – i.e. to persuade him to kill Jacob voluntarily, but when this failed he had one of the island’s soldiers (Ben) kill Locke and the body brought back to the island. The body was cloned as per usual, however on this occasion it was exposed to the memories and personality of a living man – i.e. Esau himself – and then sent forth to orchestrate Jacob’s assassination.

    *Ben complains about the endless orders he carried out on Jacob’s behalf. Ironically, he was carrying out these orders on Esau’s behalf, as Esau was impersonating Jacob during that period of time.

    THE LOOPHOLE.Esau isn’t breaking the rules – he’s simply downloaded a copy of his own personality onto a Locke clone. It’s him, but not him. Clever, huh?

  81. aonghus fallon says:

    Who is Flocke?

    I guess it’s pretty obvious who Flocke really is by now, but I thought – what the hell – I might as well give a few obvious pointers. So much for clones. Wrong, wrong, wrong. I was trying to figure out how the ‘angels’ were created but made the wrong deduction from the right evidence. The current series has made Flocke’s true identity a lot clearer.

    (1) We now know that anybody involved in the course correction (eg. the destruction of the swan station) creates a temporal paradox. As a result, they co-exist with their ‘new’ selves in the next incarnation of the loop.
    (2) This isn’t the first time one of the characters has tried course correction with the same results.
    (3) Remember how Richard gave the young Locke a test? Supposing he had made a different choice? What if he had? That sketch was probably due to a vestigal memory of what happened the last time.

    Smokie, by the way, is indeed a security system. You might also call him/it a referee. He’s there to ensure that the rules are observed. You may think Smokie’s temple massacre was a bit excessive, but MiB was breaking the rules, big time. As one of MiB’s guinea pigs, Flocke knew this but was but prevented from telling Smokie.* Well he finally got his chance, and Smokie is just ensuring an even playing field once more.

    *The ash around the cabin was to stop the two communicating. I’m guessing it isn’t ‘ash’ but magnetically charged dust – most probably, pulverised iron. Smokie is constituted from the same stuff, and as both dust and monster are positively/negatively charged, one automatically repels the other.

  82. aonghus fallon says:

    SOMETHING IN THE WATER.

    Flocke has been contaminated by the virus, an infection which replicates MiB’s personality in the host.* However this virus is not easily transmitted. In fact, transmission may only be possible via the waters of rebirth. Ilana is unconcerned as Flocke doesn’t have access to the temple. Hence her remark that ‘he can’t. Not anymore. He’s stuck this way.’ The virus may have successfully replicated itself in the past (before Flocke was caught and quarantined in Horace’s cabin) but not anymore. Flocke may have used the secret entrance in and out of the temple to infect the water, possibly with his blood. This was his first act, proably in order to recreate an army of loyal henchmen, and Sayiid was the first victim of the virus.

    Who let Flocke out? Claire, one would assume.

    * This is what Flocke means when asked by Ben if he and Jacob know one another. He replies – ‘in a manner of speaking.’ They have never met, but as Flocke’s memories and personality are indistinguishable (up to a point) from the MiB’s, the point is not as clear-cut as it might seem.

  83. Aonghus Fallon says:

    I should clarify my last entry be explaining that Flocke is infected with a mutated strain of the virus. MiB originally created the virus to generate an army of like-minded souls, all wholly loyal to him.* Those infected with a mutated strain of the virus still possess free will, but are also armed with all MiB’s wealth of experience, knowledge of the island etc. This is why Flocke constitutes such a serious threat to the status quo.

    *In ‘Sundown’ Sayiid tells the temple members to get out of Dodge before the final shoot-out. Those who have free will do so. Those who have already been infected with the original strain of the virus (i.e. those still blindly loyal to the MiB) remain and are killed by Smokie, which is fair enough – they are not serving MiB of their own volition and (if Sayiid’s resurrection is anything to go by) are no longer human. Most importantly of all, they lack free will.

  84. aonghus fallon says:

    THE DEAD.

    The island is full of them, but look closely, and you’ll find there are three distinct species.

    Spectres summoned up by Smokie. These have no corporeal existence and are just mouthpieces for Smokie, who (as referee) has no loyalty to either side but just wants to ensure the game is played according to his rules. Smokie screws around with a person’s brain so that they see something that isn’t there. This is obviously tricky, so usually only one person can see a spectre at a time. However there have been a few occasions when (out of necessity) Smokie was forced to stretch himself a bit and get more than one person to see the same spectre (e.g. inside Jacob’s temple). On the plus side, Hurley is particularly receptive, so inevitably Smokie tends to relay a lot of messages, orders warnings through him.

    The Undead. These are corpses reanimated by being immersed in the waters of rebirth. Sayiid is the most obvious example. Again, these people are not really ‘alive’ as their personalities are obliterated in the process. They end up loyal servants of MiB. If the water has been infected with Flocke’s blood, they end up loyal servants of Flocke. My guess is Smokie doesn’t approve of this carry on. The waters of rebirth were intended only to heal injuries, not to create your personal army. It’s also contrary to the ‘everybody on the island must have free will’ rule. No wonder Flocke was careful to burn Bram’s body, along with the other two henchman.

    Survivors from previous incarnations of the hoop. Create a temporal paradox and you survive into the next incarnation of the hoop in conjunction with your ‘new’ self in the new timeline. Flocke is a case in point, but Christian may well be a candidate. In both cases, their ‘new’ selves died (Flocke actually orchestrated the assassination of his new self in order to impersonate him) giving rise to the impression that the person in question had come back from the dead. Not so.

    Complicated, huh?

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  86. Aonghus Fallon says:

    THE OLD SWITCHEROO.

    Last week we got Jacob and Samuel’s back-story. It does raise some interesting questions and it got me thinking about the first time we saw them on that beach, having a chat.

    The backstory set up a certain premise, but as usual with the scriptwriters, this whole premise can be turned on its head.

    The premise is simple enough. The island’s caretaker survives by being transmitted in the form of a virus. This is the ‘infection’. It is transmitted in liquid form – ie. it has to be taken orally. The result is a loyal island guardian with vestigal memories of the possessed individual’s personality. Last week’s episode left us with the impression that by drinking from the poisoned chalice, Jacob had doomed himself to replacing his mother as a loyal island zombie while MiB had transmogrified into Smokie.

    Retrospectively the scene on the beach seemed to confirm this impression with a few qualifications. MiB was around, having briefly adopted human form to squabble with his brother. He seems like pretty much the same old MiB: bad attitude, dislike of mankind, in a hurry to get off the island. True, Jacob’s behaviour initially seemed to strike a discordant note – why is a loyal island guardian encouraging visitors? – but offering his brother that bottle of wine, effectively saying ‘here. Drink this. Turn into a zombie like me. It’ll make things easier,’ seemed to demonstrate that he still has the best interests of the island at heart.

    But what if everything about this premise is wrong? What if neither brother is what they seem? What if it is MiB who is having the last laugh at the island’s expense?

    What if one brother is in fact masquerading as the other? What if he looks like his brother, talks like his brother, to such an extent that he’s fooled the island? What if he’s pulled off an elaborate, eon-long con on something that thought it was so smart it could treat people like chess-pieces?

    Now I know there’s a lot of debate about Smokie and his ‘true’ identity. Sorry, but I’ve never believed Smokie had any other identity (unless you count the many dead people he’s impersonated throughout the series) and I don’t believe MiB is Smokie, either. To accept the following theory, preposterous and all as it might be, you need to forget about Smokie for a minute. This is what I think really happened.

    (1) The infection. The wine which Jacob’s Mom offers him should have been a simple mix of wine with water from the magic fountain. This turns you into a loyal island guardian. The water is infected with the virus. However, MiB was one step ahead of her. He substituted the diluted wine with his own unique brew: a mixture of wine, waters from the fountain – and his own blood. He didn’t know he would get killed, but he knew it was a possibility, and got a kick out of knowing that if Mom gave poor dumb Jacob a sip from the bottle she won’t be turning him into a loyal island zombie, but duplicating MiB’s personality in his own twin.

    (2) MiB. MiB’s body is resurrected in the same way as Sayid. That is, in the fountain of life, probably by Jacob before the virus fully kicked in. He’s not the rebellious MiB of old. He’s a loyal island guardian now. Only the island doesn’t know or understand this. Smokie certainly doesn’t. Smokie has been told to stop MiB leaving the island and that Jacob is the new island guardian.

    Now let’s go back to that scene on the beach. The man who looks like Jacob, is – to all intents and purposes Samuel. MiB looks like MiB, but he’s not. He’s the island’s bitch now as Jacob was intended to be.

    In this context Jacob’s gift is heavily ironic. This is how the island has inducted countless minions and it is effectively been offered a taste of its own medicine. And of course this is the infected bottle. Drinking from it would only infect the MIB zombie with the MIB virus, the last thing that the island or its guardian might want. No wonder MiB destroys the bottle in a rage.

  87. Aonghus Fallon says:

    A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE ISLAND.

    Be warned. This assumes Smokie is not the MIB. But then who is the MIB anyway?

    Cretaceous era. An asteroid from another dimension enters earth’s atmosphere via a whitehole. The asteroid generates an extremely powerful magnetic field and is controlled by an AI. The AI’s function is to examine and study alien life-forms. It’s presence is largely indectible due to its magnetic field (so powerful that it warps time to create its own self-contained time-field) which renders it more or less invisible. As part of its research, the AI makes virtual copies of local flora and fauna and downloads them into a virtual zoo. Man proves to be a particularly interesting species, if naturally destructive.

    Certain protocols are in place to deal with intelligent and potentially hostile aliens.

    (1) One of the inhabitants is abducted and infected with a virus that makes it blindly loyal to the island to the extent that he/she is willing to sacrifice the lives of others, even its own life, in order to protect the island. This ‘guardian’ can only relinquish their position after finding a willing replacement, who then drinks the blood of his/her predecessor in order to be infected by the same virus.
    (2) The island can project simulations of indigenous inhabitants whose personalities have been downloaded in order to negotiate with the locals.
    (3) Failing this, a security system – a cloud of electromagnetically-charged metal dust – patrols the island. Although a stand-alone system, this cloud has the island’s ability to scan sentient organisms, to download virtual copies of them and to project human simulations, but is essentially a roving lock-up. Its secondary function is to quarantine any creatures or individuals who would upset the delicate balance of the primary zoo at the island’s core. Over time the cloud has acquired some of its many prisoners’ traits.

    In religious terms it is probably easiest to think of the AI as ‘God’ (although its disposition is essentially feminine) the storage facility at the island’s core as ‘Heaven’ or ‘Eden’ and the Cloud as ‘Hell’. By extension, Heaven is the constant to Hell’s variable. One static, the other in eternal, restless motion.

    An island guardian kidnaps a pregnant women with the intention of inducting her off-spring as the next island guardian. However the woman gives birth to twins. One twin has an empathic ability to tap into the island’s data base, realises the nature of the infection and how it is transmitted from one guardian to the next and a great deal more besides. He is killed, but not before he has substituted the infected blood and wine with his own blood – the original ‘rebel angel’ virus – thus duplicating his own personality in his brother – the person meant to be the next guardian.

    ….AND ALL BECAUSE MUMMY LOVES NAUGHTY LITTLE BOYS.

    ‘Jacob’ is made island guardian despite his ambivalent nature (the body of the intended incumbant, but the soul, personality etc of his rebellious brother). A big decision on the part of the island, as he is the first guardian in its history to possess free will. This is a bone of contention for his twin. This is the same twin from which his personality was derived but who has since been turned into a loyal island servant via resurrection.

    Confusing, non?

    Both brothers are loyal to the island – their ‘mommy’ – albeit in very different ways. Jacob believes people should only ever serve the island of their own free will – and because Mommy Island loves him, she indulges him. Zombie Samuel wholly disagrees. He believes mankind are innately evil and anybody on the island should automatically be infected with the virus which makes them its loyal servants. By extension, he hates and distrusts his brother. For his part, Jacob regards Zombie Samuel as a threat to the outside world as he is a carrier of the ‘good angel’ virus, a virus which has the potential to turn all mankind into blindly loyal servants of the island.

    Needless to say it is Jacob who continues what he began while he was still Samuel, this time without the island or Smokie’s interference: he recruits more workers/followers off island to help him re-build the donkey-wheel, then commences work on the lighthouse etc etc. while Zombie Samuel sulks in the wings.

    Zombie Samuel is largely responsible for the cult which develops around the two brothers as he actively recruits followers from amongst Jacob’s workers, specifically those who feel a mystical, almost religious connection with the island. These people voluntarily submit to being infected with the ‘good angel’ virus via Zombie Samuel’s blood. Meanwhile, Jacob’s workers are taught by him to respect the importance of free will. As a result, there is a real idealogical friction between the two ‘tribes’, with Mommy island doing her best to arbitrate, and Smokie occasionally interceding when things get completely out of hand.

    Eventually Jacob decides he’s been around long enough. He desperately wants to die. This means (a) finding somebody willing to kill him – the only way of resigning from your position as guardian and (b) ideally, somebody who can carry on his good work – somebody with the right kind of attitude, somebody whose natural gifts will be enhanced by the island, etc. The idea is to duplicate the circumstances which made him (while he was still Samuel) so exceptional. In this respect he’s going against the island’s wishes. She has no intention of letting the same situation occur again – ie. a child being born on the island with the ability to acquire an intuitive knowledge of it.*

    *which is why no women has been able to bring a child to term since the birth of the twins.

    The only alternative is bringing a group of exceptional young men onto the island to see which respond best to it. This young man will be Jacob’s successor. John Locke is one such candidate. A successful applicant to the mittelos summer camp, he’s brought to the island around 1972 along with several others (Widmore being one of them, more than likely).

    Not completely trusting Jacob, the island decrees Zombie Samuel will undertake the education of the young candidates. The tacit assumption is that Zombie Samuel will allow the candidates to remain free agents. Zombie Samuel feels otherwise. He ensures they’re infected with the ‘good angel’ virus by drowning them in the waters of rebirth (already tainted with his blood) and resurrecting them as loyal servants of the island. His ultimate intention is to ensure Jacob’s successor is a loyal zombie guardian.

    Discovering what his brother’s up to, Jacob manages to infect the water with his own blood just in time to ensure that the young Locke (the most gifted of the potential candidates) is infected with the ‘rebel angel’ virus instead. Locke subsequently leads an insurrection against Zombie Samuel, is paralysed in the ensuing battle, then incarcerated in Horace’s cabin, where he is to spend the next thirty five years.

    THE LOOPHOLE.

    After this debacle the island tells Jacob he can only relinquish his position if he can find a replacement whose qualifications for candiditure are the same as his own. Let’s call this ‘The Cain & Abel Rule.’

    The Cain & Abel Rule. The guardian must be one of two candidates, both born on the same day of the same mother.

    Jacob fulfils this criteria. Flocke clearly does not.

    The Dharma initiative is set up by the two with the express purpose of exploring the peculiar nature of the island in the hopes of finding a loophole to this particular injunction. Once again (as when he was building the donkey-wheel and the light-house) Jacob goes on a recruitment drive. Beforehand he ensure the donkey-wheel is reset every 108 minutes, thus confining the island’s exit and entry points to a specific time so that people can be brought on and off the island with relative ease. Needless to say his behaviour is met with a certain amount of hostility from loyal followers of Zombie Samuel, and from Smokie, who kills any Dharma employees who stray too far from the camp.

    Eventually, armed with knowledge gained via the Dharma initiative, and exploiting how his prison is immune to temporal fluctuations on the island, Flocke creates a temporal paradox – one in which he was never brought to the island – then orchestrates the crash.* This is to ensure Locke (Flocke in the new, altered time-line) is brought back to the island. The island never specified that the other candidate had to be a twin: simply that he be born of the same mother on the same day.
    This is Flocke’s famous ‘loop-hole.’ By introducing Locke as a candidate he is ensuring that he now qualifies as well.
    Initially Flocke’s plan looks like it might backfire as the island and Zombie Samuel think Locke shows real potential to replace Jacob. Ultimately Locke does get the position but fails miserably at which juncture, Flocke has Ben assassinate him and in doing so qualifies by default and is released.

    *Like the others, Flocke survives the temporal anomoly created by the central characters because he was instrumental in bringing them to the island in the first place.

    FLIGHT 815.

    Flocke and Jacob have a secondary motive for orchestrating the crash. The island needs to be periodically shut down to vent excess electromagnetism from its core. And it is the search for a suitable candidate for this job which pits them against Zombie Samuel.

    Zombie Samuel has always wanted this particular task to be carried out by a candidate infected with the ‘good angel’ virus. Jacob has always insisted he can find a candidate willing to carry out the task of his/her own free will. Typically, Samuel disagrees and points out that if the chosen candidate changes his mind at the last minute, the very future of the island (and anybody on it) will be at risk. However, as island guardian, Jacob gets to over-rule his brother – with the island’s support, which says something about how much she loves him.

    I’m guessing this is really in the nature of a bet, nothing more. Samuel always has an infected candidate waiting in the wings just in case Jacob’s candidate screws up.

    On this occasion, Jacob assembles various potential candidates to carry out the task prior to his death, safe in the knowledge that his successor – Flocke – will complete what he has begun. These have to be free-thinking individuals with a bad attitude towards authority, but also sad, empty unhappy people to whom such self-sacrifice will seem worthwhile.

    These are the passengers of flight 815.

    THE LONG CON.

    From the start, Jacob and Flocke play the passengers of flight 815, one being the kind wise saintly one, the other pretending to be evil incarnate. The intention is to establish which passenger has what it takes and then to orchestrate events so that person descends of his/her own free will down into the island’s core and releases the excess electromagnetism. A bet is a bet, and they are determined to prove to Zombie Samuel it isn’t necessary to coerce or infect anybody. Flocke even accompanies Jack on his journey just to make sure everything goes according to plan.

    The fact that it took two people to turn the island off and then on is interesting. It would suggest that one was the ‘infected’ candidate, most likely Des.

    ADAM & EVE?

    Turning the island off and on again means that it begins its journey through time all over again. Which makes me wonder about Kate and Sawyer. Lapidus’s attempt to leave the island was doomed as Jack had already turned the island back on and its magnetic field would ensure the plane crashed. Given that Kate and Sawyer were in the sideways world (the island’s ‘zoo’) we know they died on the island, in Kate’s case – by her own admission – many years after Jack.

    Yeah, yeah, she told Jack she loved him and had missed him, but is it all that likely she and Sawyer didn’t get jiggy after spending most of their lives on the island? Jack may have been her true love, but he was dead whereas Sawyer was very much alive.
    Just a thought….

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